Lord’s Prayer at High Noon

Teykl-Book-CoverBy Terry Teykl –

KSBJ in Houston is one of the largest Christian radio stations in the world with more than a million listeners. As the chaplain for KSBJ, I helped launch a noon time prayer effort eight years ago centered on the Lord’s Prayer. We call it Pray Down at High Noon. Instead of an old-fashioned Texas show down at high noon, we pray as the Lord directed us.

The sun is brightest at noon and that sparks our desire for Jesus to shine brightest in our city. The goal of this prayer cadence is to see God’s presence come down on Houston and the Gulf Coast and for His will to be done and evil curtailed. With thousands praying every day we are seeing breakthroughs in our cities. Each day a recorded Christian artist or resident or child prays the Lord’s Prayer on air as people all over the area pray together. It is now the largest 21-second daily prayer meeting in the world! In fact it has now spread to other time zones in the world.

We want this practice of directed prayer to focus on the 2016 General Conference of the United Methodist Church in Portland. This has been a coordinated effort for the past four General Conferences. As we approach the upcoming gathering in Portland, we want members of local United Methodist congregations to actively participate in “Praying the Lord’s Prayer at Noon.” I believe progressives and conservatives and unlabeled disciples can pray this together. And the desired effect would be that God’s will would be done in all matters of General Conference. The cumulative and combined effect of thousands of United Methodists praying every day could turn the tide in our church and welcome His will in our denominational matters. Since the theme for General Conference is Matthew 28:19, our hope is a renewed church with a passion to reach people for Christ.

I have written a small guide based on the Lord’s Prayer to help members pray at noon. It is a 14-day devotional (numbered after the 14 days in May in Portland) with an application for prayer that is personal to community wide. There is a community nature to the prayer as Jesus taught us, “Our Father … give us … forgive us … lead us … deliver us.” In essence the guide helps people pray over specific people in the church for daily bread, forgiveness, protection, and kingdom living, etc.

In a crazy and mixed-up world of random shootings and temptations to sin I love the idea of someone at noon asking God to deliver me or you from evil. Perhaps in such corporate agreement we could minimize evil’s assault and maximize divine guardianships. It delights me when I see headlines in the Houston Chronicle that read “Violent Crime on Decline” or “Murder Rate has Dropped in Houston” – and for no inexplicable reason! Or I hear the story of a girl praying for her parents at noon and unknown to her the dad was being robbed at that moment and was spared imminent death. I would like to credit the power of God coming down in answer to the Lord’s Prayer.

This idea of praying at noon is not new. In 1857, Jeremiah Lampier launched a noon time prayer meeting on Fulton Street in New York in an abandoned church. He was the care taker of this empty church and was a tailor by trade. Sitting on a park bench, Lampier saw the depression on people’s face from the economic situation of New York at that time. The first day of the prayer meeting was September 23, 1857. He opened the doors and no one came at first. Then, thirty minutes later six show up. Then, twenty appeared the next day. In months the church was full at noon and it spread all over the city and the east coast.

Some say a million people came to Christ from this noon time prayer and it even started the mission movement to Korea. Nevertheless a move of God came from what was called the Fulton Street Revival. If God can start a revival in an abandoned church he can certainly move in an inhabited church like yours. All he needs is someone to pray with shameless audacity. It takes only 21 seconds to recite the words, but that 21 seconds could change us by causing us to begin living the Lord’s Prayer.

Terry Teykl is a United Methodist clergyperson and an author and speaker about prayer evangelism. He is chaplain for KSBJ, a Christian radio station in Houston, a prayer pastor at the Faithbridge United Methodist Church, and adjunct Professor for the Bible Seminary in Katy, Texas. For the past four General Conferences he has collaborated with other organizations to cover this important conference with prayer.

Dr. Teykl would be happy to send you a sample prayer guide for the 14-day format if you contact him at tteykl@comcast.net. The prayer guides are $1 apiece in order to cover production costs.

Comments

  1. Mary Jo Billitter says

    I am a member of the Prayer Action Team at First United Methodist Church in Lexingotn, KY. We are interested in viewing 2 sample prayer guides in plans for our Church praying for the General Conference May 10 – 20. Thank you. Mary Jo Billitter, 859-321-1319.

  2. Brian Moore says

    I think The Lord’s Prayer is an amazing idea I have started this at the company I work for and will move forward with sharing across all social media to get the word across

Trackbacks

  1. […] PRAYER FOR GENERAL CONFERENCE A message from Terry Teykl: As we approach the upcoming gathering in Portland, we want members of local United Methodist congregations to actively participate in “Praying the Lord’s Prayer at Noon.” I believe progressives and conservatives and unlabeled disciples can pray this together. And the desired effect would be that God’s will would be done in all matters of General Conference. The cumulative and combined effect of thousands of United Methodists praying every day could turn the tide in our church and welcome His will in our denominational matters. Since the theme for General Conference is Matthew 28:19, our hope is a renewed church with a passion to reach people for Christ. – See more at: https://goodnewsmag.org/2015/11/lords-prayer-at-high-noon […]

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